Thursday, March 24, 2016

Viswanathan Anand vs. Petet Svidler
6th Round, 2016 Moscow Candidates Tournament

1. e4, e5
2. Nf3, Nc6
3. Bb5, a6
4. Ba4, Nf6
5. 0-0, Be7
6. Re1, b5
7. Bb3, 0-0
8. a4, Bb7
9. d3, Re8
10. Nbd2, Bf8
11. c3 ...

Anand prepares for d4....

11. ... Na5
12. Bc2, c5
13. d4, exd4
14. cxd4, d5
15. e5, Ne4
16. axb5, axb5
17. Nxe4, dxe4
18. Rxe4 ....

The Rook is poisoned.  If 18....Bxe4, 19. Bxe4 followed by 20. Bxh7 and 21. Ng5 with good attacking prospects.

18. .... Nb3

Black offers his Knight in return, to lure White's c2 Bishop away from action.

19. Rxa8, Bxa8
20. Ng5, Nxc1
21. Qh5!! ....

   
White's attacking prospects are greater than the value of captured material.  Here, White has a two-pronged attack.

21. .... h6
22. Qxf7+, Kh8
23. Rg4 ....

The move takes the Rook away from harm, and defends the Knight from Black's Queen.  If 23. Qg6, then Black equalizes with Qxg5.

Now, if 23....hxg5, then 22. Qh5+ Kg8, 23. Bh7+ Kh8, 24. Bg6+ Kg8, 25. Qh7 mate.

23. .... Qa5

Black creates a diversion on the Queen side of the board.

24. h4 ....


Whites creates an escape square for his King.

Having no other good move, Black resigns. White's Queen cannot be prevented from going to g6 and h7.


Sicilian Defense

GM Ian Rogers vs. IM Michael Hennigan
Hastings Premier, 1993

1. e4, c5
2. Nf3, Nc6
3. Bb5, e6
4. Bxc6, bxc6
5. 0-0, d5
6. d3, Ne7
7. c4, Ng6

Undeterred by a double-pawn, Black develops his pieces.

8. Nc3, Be7

Black should have moved 8. .... Bd6 right away.

9. b3, 0-0
10. Ba3, Bd6
11. Re1, d4
12. Na4, e5

Black has to block the advance of White's e-pawn.

13. Bxc5, Nf4
14. g3?! ....

A dubious move.  14. h3 makes more sense.

14. .... Nh3+
15. Kg2, Bg4

Black threatens Ng5 winning the Knight.

16. Qd2, f5!!
 


17. Ng1 ....

White cannot take the pawn.  Doing so would put tremendous pressure on the f-file.

If 17. Nxe5 Bxe5, 18. Bxf8 Ng5! Black plays aggressively.

17. .... Nxg1
18. Kxg1, Bf3
19. Bxd6, Qxd6
20. Qg5, f4
21. Rec1 ....

White's King intends to run to the queen side.

21. .... Rf6
22. Kf1, Rg6
23. c5, Qc7
24. Qh4, Rh6
25. Qg5, Rh5!!
 
 The Queen is "mated", so White resigns.  While 25.....Rxh2 is also good, the text nails down the Queen immediately.

A superb ending !

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Caro-Kann Defense, Classical Variation

ALEXANDER BELIAVSKY vs. BENT LARSEN
Tilburg, 1981

1. e4, c6
2. d4, d5
3. Nc3, dxe4
4. Nxe4, Bf5
5. Ng3, Bg6
6. h4, h6
7. Nf3, Nd7
8. h5, Bh7
9. Bd3, Bxd3
10. Qxd3, Ngf6
11. Bf4, e6
12. 0-0-0, Be7
13. Ne5, a5
14. Rhe1, a4
15. Ng6! ....

White intends to break open Black's defenses.  The sacrifice is necessary.

15. .... Nd5

If 15....fxg6, 16. Qxg6+ Kf8, 17. Rxe6 with a good game for White.

16. Nf5!! ....

White intends to mate with Nxg7....

16. .... Bf8

If 16.....fxg6, then 17. Nxg7+ Kf8 (if 17....Kf7, 18. Qxg6+!!), 18. Nxe6+ and Black loses his Queen.

If 16.....exf5, then 17. Nxe7 Nxf4 (if 17.....Nxe7, then 18. Bd6), 18. Nxc6+ Kf8, 19. Qa3+ and Black loses his Queen.

17. Bd6!! ....

The Bishop could not be taken because of the threat Nxg7 mate or Nxd6 mate.

17. .... Rg8

If 17. .... fxg6, then 18. Nxg7+ Bxg7, 19. Qxg6 mate.

18. c4, Nb4
19. Qh3, fxg6
20. Rxe6+, Kf7
21. hxg6+, Kxe6
22. Re1+, Ne5

If 22.....Kf6, then 23. Nxh6 gxh6, 24. Re6+ Kg5, 25. e4 mate.

23. Bxe5, Resigns

White threatens 24. Nxh6+ Ke7, 25. Nxg8+ Ke8, 26. Bd6+ and White wins.


Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Sicilian Defense, Botvinnik Defense I Edge Variation

ISTVAN BILEK vs. FLORIN GHEORGHIU
Bucharest, Romania, 1968

1. e4, c5
2. Nc3, Nc6
3. g3, g6
4. Bg2, Bg7
5. d3, d6
6. f4, e5
7. Nh3, Nge7

The Botvinnik Defense I, Edge Variation.

8. 0-0, 0-0
9. f5, gxf5
10. exf5, Bxf5
11. Rxf5!! ....

A necessary sacrifice to open up the e4-h7 diagonal.

11. .... Nxf5
12. Be4, Nfd4
13. Qh5, Re8

If 13...f5, then 14. Ng5 h6, 15. Bd5+ Kh8, 16. Qg6 (threatening Qh7 mate) hxg5, 17. Qh5+ Bh6, 18. Qxh6 mate.

If 13....h6, then 14. Bxh6 gxh6, 15. Qxh6 f5, 16. Bd5+ Rf7, 17. Ng5 with a good game for White.

14. Qxh7+, Kf8
15. Bg5, Qd7

If 15....f6, then 16. Bd5 fxg5, 17. Qg8+ Ke7, 18. Qxg7 mate.

16. Nd5, Re6

If 16....f6, then 17. Nxf6 Qe6, 18. Bd5 with a good game for White.

17. Rf1, Nxc2
18. Bg6!! ....

Taking advantage of the pin, White presses on with the attack.

18. .... N2d4
19. Bh6!!, Resigns

If 19....Bxh6, then 20.Qh8 mate. The same mating move follows after 19....g6 or g5.



Sunday, October 19, 2014

Colle System

EDGAR COLLE vs. J. O'HANLON
Nice, 1930

The Colle System, also known as the Colle–Koltanowski system, is a chess opening strategy for White introduced by Belgian Edgard Colle in the 1920s, and further developed by George Koltanowski. This variation of the Queen's Pawn Game is characterised by a systematic if modest development of White's minor pieces to support a quick pawn move to the e4 square. It is solid, but inflexible.

Ignoring Black's responses in order to consider White's moves only, the typical plan is as follows: 1.d4 2.e3 3.Nf3 4.Bd3 5.0-0 6.Re1 7.c3 8.Nbd2 9.e4, with White rearranging his move order appropriately. It is a perfectly solid scheme of development, but, inflexibly applied, it cannot offer more than equality against a vigorous Black response. It may be a good tool for avoiding book variations, for Blitz play, or for forcing opponents to think for themselves early on. These days it is considered totally innocuous, and is rarely seen at Master level or above.

1. d4, d5
2. Nf3, Nf6
3. e3, c5
4. c3, e6
5. Bd3, Bd6
6. Nbd2, Nbd7
7. 0-0, 0-0
8. Re1, Re8
9. e4, dxe4
10. Nxe4, Nxe4
11. Bxe4, cxd4
12. Bxh7+!! ....

White has determined Black's weakness, and presses on with the attack.

12. .... Kxh7
13. Ng5+, Kg6
14. h4!!, Rh8

The pawn intends to land at h5, to menace the opponent King.

15. Rxe6!! ....

The move breaks apart the King's defenses.

15. .... Nf6

If 15....fxe6, then 16. Qd3+ Kf6 (if 16....Kh5, 17. Qf3+ Kxh4, 18. Qh3 or g3 mate.), 17. Qf3+ Ke5 (if 17....Ke7, 18. Qf7 mate), 18. Nf7 mate.

16. h5!!, Kh6

If 16....Rxh5, then 17. Qd3+ Kh6, 18. Nxf7 mate.

17. Rxd6 ....

White already wins with 17. Nxf7 but decides to place his Rook to safety.

17. .... Qa5
18. Nxf7+, Kh7
19. Ng5+ ....

White cannot attack with Qd3+ because of Bf5.

19. .... Kg8

If 19....Kh6, then 20. Ne6+ Kh7, 21. Qd3+ Kg8, 22. Rd8+.

20. Qb3+, Resigns

Black cannot prevent mate at f7. 

Friday, October 17, 2014

Queen's Gambit Accepted, Janowski-Larsen Variation

ALBERTO FOGUELMAN vs. DAVID BRONSTEIN
Amsterdam International, 1964

1. d4, d5
2. c4, dxc4
3. Nf3, Nf6
4. e3, Bg4

The Janowski-Larsen Variation of Queen's Gambit Accepted.

5. Bxc4, e6
6. Qb3?!, Bxf3
7. gxf3 ....

The double-pawn structure may benefit White if he plans to castle on the queen side and his opponent on the king side, but White eventually castled where the war zone is.

7. .... c5
8. Qxb7, Ncd7
9. dxc5, Bxc5
10. f4 ....

Apparently White is trying to attack the e6 pawn, but this move benefited Black more.

10. .... 0-0
11. 0-0, Nd5
12. Rd1, Rb8
13. Qc6, Qh4!!

Black threatens Qg4+ threatening White's d1 Rook.

14. Nc3, Rb6

If 14.....Nxc3, 15. Rxd7 and the position favors White.

15. Qxd7, Nxf4!!

16. Ne2 ....

White could not take the f4 Knight because of 16.....Qxf2+ 17. Kh1 Qf3 mate.

16. .... Nh3+
17. Kg2 ....

Forced.  If 17. Kf1 Qxf2 mate.  If 17. Kh1 Qe4+, 18. f3 Qxf3 mate.

17. .... Nxf2
18. Rd4, Ng4

Black threatens 19....Qxh2 20. Kf1 Qf2 mate.

19. Rf4, Qxh2+
20. Kf1, Bxe3!!
21. Bd5, Bxf4

White resigns.  Black threatens Qf2 mate, Now, if 22. Ke1, then Qf2+, 23. Kd1 Qf1+, 24. Kc2 Qxe2+ and the position favors Black.


Wednesday, October 15, 2014

French Defense, Winawer Fingerslip Variation - Kunin Double Gambit

KUNIN vs. OCHSENGOIT
Moscow, 1958

1. e4, e6
2. d4, d5
3. Nc3, Bb4

The Winawer Variation of the French Defense.

4. Bd2, dxe4
5. Qg4, Qxd4

The Kunin Double Gambit of the French Defense.  White sacrifices two central pawns to open up attacking lines.

6. 0-0-0, f5
7. Bg5, Qe5

An exchange of Queens would favor White.

8. Rd8+, Kf7
9. Nf3!!, Qa5

If 9....exf3, then 10. Qxb4 c5, 11. Qb5 Nc6, 12. Rxc8 Rxc8, 13. Qxc7+ and White gains materials.

10. Bb5!! ....

Despite dangers to his Queen and Knight, White presses on with the attack. This subtle move actually has two mating threats.  One is Bf8+ followed by Bg6 or Bh5 mate, and the other is Ne5 (also mate).

10. .... Nc6?

Black might prolong the game with 10....Nf6 but the end result is also mate.   The game would continue:  11. Ne5+ Ke7, 12. Bxf6+ Kxf6 (not 12....gxf6, 13. Qg7+ Kxe8, 14. Qxf6+ Be7, 15. Qxh8 and mate next move.), 13. Nxe4+ Kxe5 (if 13....fxe4 then 14. Qf4+ Ke7, 15. Qg5 mate.), 14. f4+ Kxe4, 15. Qf3 mate.

11. Ne5+!!, Resigns
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